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Eboni Boykin

Freelance writer focused on entertainment media

Brooklyn, NY

Eboni Boykin

Eboni Boykin is an opinion and cultural analysis writer from the southern United States. She combines her extensive knowledge of genre films with her critical thinking training from the English BA program at Columbia University in the City of New York.

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The Re-Imagining of the Real-Life Female Warriors in ‘Black Panther’

One of the most important praises for Marvel’s Black Panther film is for the movie’s inclusion and focus on the king’s army of warrior women–the Dora Milaje. These women are sworn to celibacy, as they are technically the king’s wives, whose sole duty and purpose is to protect king and kingdom. As rare as the image of black female warriors are, it is not surprising that the actual existence of such a troop of female warriors is lost on many–a fact only now rectified by their reference in Black Panther.
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EXCLUSIVE: ‘The Quad’ Co-Creator Felicia D. Henderson on How Black Lives Matter has Influenced the Series

HBR had the opportunity to speak with the co-creator of the hit BET drama The Quad, Felicia D. Henderson, who has been dubbed as “TV-writing-and-producing royalty.”. Upon being asked what she thinks of that title, she says only that she is happy she’s blessed enough to do exactly what she wants to do.
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Living Single on Hulu: The Cultural Importance of Making Black Sitcoms Available to Stream

My vision for my life was changed when I discovered Susan Fales Hill’s popular 80s-90s sitcom, A Different World. Never had I seen any entertainment content that made me so happy and proud to be black. For the first time, I saw young black people my age living, loving, and laughing in a context that I could relate to.
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Why Are We Ignoring Female-Centric Horror Films?

the majority of horror films in existence today are insulting to all female and female-identifying humans, with their hyper emphasis on feminine “purity,” and protagonists whose incompetency is only cured by the killing of the viable male hero. But what other genre has it embedded within itself to regularly feature an independent female character who has to save herself?
Women and Hollywood Link to Story
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Hunger Games: Catching Fire: a Small Victory for Feminist Cinema

The latest Hunger Games installment is quickly sweeping the country and the box office, to the excitement of fans of the book series turned movie franchise. Katniss Everdeen, the film’s quick witted warrior protagonist, is the kind of warrior woman character that audiences seem to take a liking to but don’t see much of (The Resident Evil franchise comes to mind).
Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality Link to Story
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‘Insidious’ sequel as scary as its predecessor

The team behind the 2011 horror film “Insidious” has returned to haunt movie theaters with a sequel that delivers laughs and a few good frights. “Insidious: Chapter 2” features Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne in a film directed by James Wan and written by Leigh Whannell—both responsible for “Saw.”. The sequel is virtually as bloodless as the first, which is surprising considering the torture-porn aesthetic associated with the “Saw” franchise.
Columbia Daily Spectator, Columbia University Link to Story
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Harlem artists talk ‘African art’ label with student groups

Artists of African descent walk a delicate line in the world of modern art, facing the risk of being marginalized by their ethnicity. The African Students Association and the Black Students Organization brought that conversation to campus with a pop-up gallery and conversation on how topics from domestic violence to fashion trends and ancestral memory should be dealt with in painting.
Columbia Daily Spectator, Columbia University Link to Story
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Israel-Palestine doc captures conflict with deft camera, character work

The new film The Green Prince tells the story of the Israeli internal security services top informant, who turned against his father, a top Hamas leader, when he was just 17. The films use of documentary and re-enactment makes it compelling. The number one source for Israel's internal security service, the Shin Bet, was just 17 when he began his career as a spy.
Columbia Daily Spectator, Columbia University Link to Story
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Wiseman discusses new film at Italian Academy

Documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman is no stranger to college campuses. Wiseman, renowned for showing the inner workings of American life through his documentaries about public institutions, was at the Italian Academy on Tuesday to show segments of his new film, “At Berkeley,” for which he shot 250 hours of film.
Columbia Daily Spectator, Columbia University Link to Story
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'Carrie' remake fresh, relevant

The newest adaptation of "Carrie," released on Oct. 18, seeks to be a new interpretation of the 1976 classic based on Stephen King's book, rather than just another stale Hollywood remake. “Carrie” offers an fresh re-imagining of the 1976 classic, delivering plenty of gore and thrills for today's blood-loving horror fan.
Columbia Daily Spectator, Columbia University Link to Story
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Political Minutes: The State of the Nation

On November 9, Dr. Alondra Nelson, Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies Professor at Columbia, moderated a discussion on “The State of the Nation: Race, Gender and the 2012 Elections.”. On the distinguished panel of women scholars and activists participating in this discussion were Darlene Nipper, Deputy Executive Director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Rebecca Traister, author and columnist for Salon.com and Patricia J.
Columbia Political Review Link to Story
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113th Congress: The House May be More Diverse than Ever, But It Will Lead to Division

The new diversity in the U.S. House of Representatives is being wildly celebrated, especially in the feminist community. But is the triumph here really more diversity? The word diversity is thrown around quite a bit, mostly to indicate variety and the co-existence of differences. However, what the general conversation should actually be about is the exchange of ideas between the people in a diverse group, and the melding together of these ideas into a common vision.
Mic News Link to Story

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Eboni Boykin